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"Tired" of getting stuck off-road

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Old 02-22-2012, 03:31 PM
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"Tired" of getting stuck off-road

Hey guys, I need some advise and opinions. I use my truck 80% of the time/miles for towing my 11K, 25', TT toyhauler. Yes, it is a 2007 with just over 13K miles. I have stock michelin tires and suspension. I'm sick of getting stuck in soft dirt or just a bit of sand while in 4x4 when I go camping and have to go off road.

I picked up a set of some used forged Powerwagon rims that I was thinking of powder coating a dark color grey, teflon, black, etc. What do you guys think? Anyone done this? What about the caps? Pictures?

Now for the tires? What is suggested to keep me going in the dirt and yet behave as needed when towing? What sizes would be best? I'd like to go bigger and would do a leveling kit up front if needed. Best brands for the tires?

Sorry for all the questions. I value the great knowledge and tastes of the guys on the DTR forums
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Old 02-22-2012, 04:15 PM
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As you mostly drive on road use a good road tire but carry a set of chains for going off road, chains are not only for snow..
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Old 02-22-2012, 07:26 PM
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Off-road just about anything will be an improvement over the stock Michelins. You need an All Terrain tire (as opposed to All Season like the Michelins). I tried BFG ATs, a buddy of mine tried the Toyos on his CTD. We both are now running the Hankook AT-Ms and are very impressed with the great traction and wear (or lack thereof). Have not ever been stuck with the Hankooks and I drive in snow, mud, snowy mud, sand, etc. Be prepared for a 1-2mpg drop though, if you go bigger (285-70s).
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Old 02-22-2012, 11:37 PM
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285/75/17 Nitto Trail Grapplers.
With the miles you drive they will dry rot before you wear them out.

Probably wouldn't need a leveling kit so you won't have to worry about screwing with towing and suspension geometry.


They are a little squishy at first but ride and drive just great. More aggressive than A/T.
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:24 AM
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Thanks guys for the good suggestions (not counting Busboy). Yes, even my Michelins are dry rotting and they look brand new! So, I'd like to get as aggressive of a tire as I reasonable can that I can still tow safely with. Also, it is probably best to stay away from tire sizes that I'd need a leveling kit for. So, the 285/75 is probably the way to go huh? Keep 'em coming guys...
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Old 02-23-2012, 08:37 AM
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I have never been stuck neither off road nor in the snow with my Michelins LT265/70R17/E tires. I am an old jeepster from the 70's and I learn a long time ago a very valuable lesson when running my jeeps off road on the sand and dirt. I would air down the tires to a lower air pressure setting. This provides a larger surface area for the tire to spread out and will keep the vehicle from getting stuck. You just have to go slow and easy no speed in this case or trailer towing.
I carry a portable air compressor with me to air the tires up when I reach payment or a hard pack dirt road.

Jim W.
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:05 AM
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These, 800 miles on these tires, see the wet grass? Had to have an F150 pull me out.

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Or these?





I use the second tire now.
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by mega-engr View Post
Thanks guys for the good suggestions (not counting Busboy). Yes, even my Michelins are dry rotting and they look brand new! So, I'd like to get as aggressive of a tire as I reasonable can that I can still tow safely with. Also, it is probably best to stay away from tire sizes that I'd need a leveling kit for. So, the 285/75 is probably the way to go huh? Keep 'em coming guys...
Toyo also makes a M/T in the 285/75 size.


I'd try this size first without a lift to keep it simple.




good luck!
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:37 AM
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when in sand, you need to let a lot of air out of your tires. To the best of my knowledge you can have the best tires money can buy and your still going to get stuck.

also some time unhooking and checking your path without trailer attached may help you avoid getting stuck.

Driving in sand takes some practice. it is not something you can just creep through. speed and momentum are necessary to avoid getting the chains out
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:56 AM
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Mega, I haven't tried the Hankooks but ran some Toyo 265/75 ATs on my '99 2nd gen 4x4. I lived in sandy country at the time. The toyos wore very well even with all the heat and heavy towing (mostly hay & equipment) and did much better on wet clay and dry sand than the BFG and Coopers I had tried. But yeah, you should be able to get by with a 285/75.
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Jim W View Post
I have never been stuck neither off road nor in the snow with my Michelins LT265/70R17/E tires. I am an old jeepster from the 70's and I learn a long time ago a very valuable lesson when running my jeeps off road on the sand and dirt. I would air down the tires to a lower air pressure setting. This provides a larger surface area for the tire to spread out and will keep the vehicle from getting stuck. You just have to go slow and easy no speed in this case or trailer towing.
I carry a portable air compressor with me to air the tires up when I reach payment or a hard pack dirt road.

Jim W.
Hi Jim, I 100% agree and you guys are 100% correct on airing down and not getting stuck nearly as easy. I can certainly do some things to help my situation. However, most times, I'm arriving to friends campsites at night and a bit late. I just don't want to stop and get out and have to air down. I even carry a compressor. I'm willing to do that even, but I am amazed at what I get stuck in. I just think I don't need to, and then it is too late.

So, I just think a better tire will get me through most of these situations and of course when the going gets tough, I need to do the right thing with any tire.

Originally Posted by Rednecktastic View Post
These, 800 miles on these tires, see the wet grass? Had to have an F150 pull me out.



Or these?





I use the second tire now.
Can't see the second one . At least I try to go find another Dodge to pull me out! I was lucky enough to find one this President's weekend.
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Rednecktastic View Post
Toyo also makes a M/T in the 285/75 size.


I'd try this size first without a lift to keep it simple.




good luck!
Thank you for letting me know! So far, I guess I should look at:

Toyo
Nitto
Hancook

In the 285/75 size. Then consider the AT or MT versions.
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by mega-engr View Post
Thanks guys for the good suggestions (not counting Busboy).
While you may discount my suggestion right off the bat, the people suggesting tires are not pulling a trailer off road. The more aggressive the tread the poorer the fuel economy and noisier on the hiway.

Have a look at these http://simpletire.com/multi-mile-lt2...17-xts91-tires I think they will be our next tire. I have compared them side by side with the Nitto Grapplers and the Nokian Rotiiva AT, these look better. They are a relatively new tire but the local phone company here is using them on ALL their trucks. They are supposed to be quiet on the hiway and give good mileage.
If you do buy a more aggressive tire throw a pair of tire chains in your toolbox for when you do get stuck with that trailer.
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Old 02-23-2012, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Busboy View Post
While you may discount my suggestion right off the bat, the people suggesting tires are not pulling a trailer off road. The more aggressive the tread the poorer the fuel economy and noisier on the hiway.

Have a look at these http://simpletire.com/multi-mile-lt2...17-xts91-tires I think they will be our next tire. I have compared them side by side with the Nitto Grapplers and the Nokian Rotiiva AT, these look better. They are a relatively new tire but the local phone company here is using them on ALL their trucks. They are supposed to be quiet on the hiway and give good mileage.
If you do buy a more aggressive tire throw a pair of tire chains in your toolbox for when you do get stuck with that trailer.
Good points, it is just that my original intent is not how to not get stuck with the tires I have... I understand about airing down and then things to do once you're stuck. I also know that once I start to get stuck, I stop and not get burried. By the time I have to air down (and air back up eventually) just to get through some sections, I am able to find a 2 wheel drive truck with decent tires and yank me along... It is lame. So, I just want a better set of tires that I can get through some sections that other trucks pulling trailers get through without having to stop, air down, etc... With the few miles I drive/tow overall, I'm not too worried about the noise or MPG penalty. Again, I have a set of Powerwagon wheels I want to use and will still have the steelies and highway tires if I really want to swap things back or around... I'm looking to get a little more balance overall for what I do and tow. I can sacrifice the on-road aspects a little to gain some going off the road for the result of not having to air down/up or put chains, etc. just get through what other people are getting through... Being prepared with chain and to air/up down, I all ready am. It sucks though.
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Old 02-23-2012, 02:43 PM
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Have a good look at the tire I suggested in real life, I think you will be impressed, like I said it will be our next tire, and the price is good. It has a 16mm tread depth, good siping and the grooves are full depth all the way to the side of the tire. Unlike some that reduce the depth at the sides so once its worn a little they could hydroplane easier because the water can't get out quickly.
The beauty of using chains is you don't have to adjust the tire pressures, my son takes a cargo trailer places you wouldn't think possible, he slips on the chains just on the rear and out performs trucks with no chains and no trailer.
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