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24 Valve Engine and Drivetrain Discuss the 24 Valve engine and drivetrain here. No non-drivetrain discussions please. NO HIGH PERFORMANCE DISCUSSION!

Common Problems and How Do I Articles Needed...

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Old 04-29-2011, 10:14 PM   #31  
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This is a well documented problem that seems to be ignored by Dodge and selectively addressed by Cummins, but with still significant costs to the owner.
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Old 01-12-2012, 04:51 PM   #32  
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Long warm up

My stock 2000 RAM 2500 takes 10 minutes to warm up to the point that it will run above an idle. This happens always, even in 80 degree weather. Using the block heater shortens the time somewhat. My neighbor has a 2001 and his is the same way. I've been told this a fact of life for these trucks, but that would make them somewhat useless for daily drivers (mine is a secondary vehicle).
I've seen posters in other forums say to put in a higher temp thermostat, but I can't see how that would change anything. Anyone have any knowledge about this?
Thanks
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Old 01-12-2012, 04:52 PM   #33  
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Sorry if I mis-posted - this site is clearly not for computer lightweights.
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Old 09-04-2012, 11:27 AM   #34  
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Here is an idea for a problem area on our trucks.

Bleeding the clutch! I know there is a pre-assembled unit for both the master/slave cylinders with the line betweem them. But if your like me and need to fix your truck as fast as you can, most parts stores only stock the individual components. My local Dodge dealer doesn't have the parts counter open on the weekend either.

There's gotta be some tricks to get this system to bleed out. There is no bleeder screw on the slave cyl. I just changed both of these and can't get it to work right.. Need to bleed the air from the system but cant figure out how
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Old 04-13-2013, 01:03 PM   #35  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodda View Post
To fix torque converter cycling and transmission shift cycling several options known to work:

1. wrap the alternator output wire with a metallic shielding (tin foil or similar) and follow-up with electrical tape. This is the feed wire from the alternator to the battery (may be black/orange in color)

2. Install a RFI filter on the alternator output wire and/or the APPS circuit wire (APPS sensor to the ECM). Almost any decent RFI filter/choke should work. Search for these terms:

47RE RFI Noise Filter
RF Choke
RF Ferrite Choke

3. Clean all ground-wire connections at the battery terminals, engine block, and firewall.

4. Locate the ground-wire connector for the PCM (behind the passenger-side battery). Cut out the connector and solder the wires together (do not use another butt connector). Seal with heatshrink.
Just supporting this thread, I had a Torque converter cycling issue and put a ferrite on the Alt output and the problem went away...thanks for the info
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Old 08-31-2013, 04:36 PM   #36  
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rear drum brakes 01

#14 wrote something that really rang true for me,the rear brakes on my 2001 are just along for the ride and provide practically no braking.I tow a heavy travel trailer from Canada to Mexico every year and back again and it really bugs me these big heavy drum brakes are cold as a cucumber and the front brakes are smokin hot and it did not seem to matter that i would adjust them.So i removed the spare tire and took off the bar that connects between the axle and an automatically brake adjusting devise attached on the frame.I manually turn the dial and set it as if the truck had a load in the back.Personally i like the rear brakes to apply even and equal with the fronts,this probably is not for everyone,but when your pulling your not going to set any records for stopping fast and i prefer more rubber and braking slowing me down.The braking devise can be easily dialed back to normal braking when not towing.
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Old 09-02-2013, 04:32 PM   #37  
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vp44 qualifies as common problem

I,m new to this forum,i,ve had a 2001 24 valve 4x4 for about 5 years now.I,ve been extremely disappointed taking the truck to the dealer for repairs so i,m learning to be my own mechanic.A few things i,ve learned about the notorious vp44,what were they thinking attaching sensitive electronics to the vp44 then bolting it directly to the cylinder wall,it could not be in a hotter location.It did not work out well for the lift pumps and has not worked out well for the inj. pump.So i am now on my second inj. pump and have had problems with hard starting when hot from day one of the new rebuilt pump.First thing i learned the cheapest $1200 pump has not been fully rebuilt,don,t expect to much.If your truck does not like to start when hot,try pouring water over the INJ pump till it is cool,if it starts right up start saving your money for a new pump.The electronic chip board located right on top of the inj pump has been subjected to heat and vibration and was not replaced the last time it was rebuilt,they are only good for so many resets.We must do whatever we can to make the vp44 run cooler,remove the insulation under your hood,consider running a 180 degree thermostat if you tow and live in a hot climate,Install a fuel pressure gauge,Change or set your lift pump to run at the optimum fuel pressure of 18 psi for more cooling. When you do choose a new pump you need some assurances that all the integral parts have been changed and not just bench tested ok.I don,t want OK,i want new.
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Old 09-03-2013, 02:51 PM   #38  
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build your own inexpensive fuel pressure guage

If you have a dodge ram cummins 5.9 diesel between 1998 and 2002 you need a fuel pressure gauge to monitor.
Somewhere on some forum i read how to make your own fuel pressure guage and have had it in my truck for many years.Find yourself some sections of grease gun hose,they come with threaded fittings on both ends,this hose is tough and good for 3600 psi.Then bring your sections of hose with you when buying your hydraulic fittings,you will need some couplings and perhaps an elbow or two a tee,a gauge that goes to 30 psi,i found a universal gauge $18 dollars, a little valve.Break your fuel line at the rubber section between your filter and inj pump,you may need to shorten the metal fuel line to get the tee in there.I added the little shut off valve to dampen the throbbing or vibration effect of the inj pump.Some models may have a nipple to attach too.Drill a hole through your firewall,i found the hose nicely friction fits between the door post and the side of the dash,then an elbow and the guage nicely fits into corner without any fastening devises.I never get a diesel smell and if i need to work on it the hose is long enough to take the gauge off outside the truck.I built mine for 50 bucks and it WILL save you the cost and inconvenience of a new injector pump.
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Old 09-05-2013, 04:49 PM   #39  
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How to increase fuel pressure on standard in tank lift pump

I would like to share my findings on experimenting with the intank fuel pump so many of us have.I became interested in it after seeing Glacier Diesels article in-tank pump exposed.The problem being the in-tank pump supplies marginal fuel pressure to the inj.pump,however has the capacity to put out much more.If your intank pump looks like the one in Glacial Diesels article IN TANK PUMP EXPOSED this small adjustment will work,which is at least three generations of truck.Remove the fuel tank,it is not necessary to unbolt the box,if yours is 4x4 model you can sit upright with your head up under the side panel of the box,you will be looking directly at the pump on top of the fuel tank,disconnect the electric plug and fuel lines,hoses.Tie straps supporting tank,only then remove steel straps.Ok the rest is self explanatory.When your near empty tank is out and away from the truck,remove the big threaded plastic ring and pull out the pump.Look for the crossover tube just 2 inches above the actual pump,.on the end of the cross-over bypass tube is a plug,you need to drill a tiny hole in the plug so you can get a hooked tool into the hole to pull out the plug.It is fragile and plastic, pull strait and if it seems to difficult hit it with some heat,a couple of seconds,also when it pops out you may loose the spring,pull it out on a clean confined area so you will not loose the spring and tiny round rubber seal.If you have a vp44 pump you need only replace the spring with another with a little more pressure.When putting the spring assembly back together you need to put a small tight fitting screw in the drilled hole.Before you start any of this you need to of had a gauge and monitoring prior to this adjustment so you can compare.I had 13 psi prior to this adjustment,I put a strong spring in and completely blocked the by-pass and achieved 23 psi,THIS IS TO MUCH PRESSURE FOR THE VP44 BUT FINE FOR THE CPS INJ PUMP.I tested driving my truck with low fuel and a completely blocked by-pass and did not effect the motor.Even when you are 1/8 of a tank the fuel level is half way up the cup or reservoir and the fuel quickly finds the outside fuel level through the bottom but will not let the fuel out of the reservoir.The slosh factor as well is quite extreme for filling the cup or reservoir.At more than 1/4 of a tank the cup or reservoir is completely submerged and low fuel complications are not an issue.Also at this time the vp44 must stay cool from returning fuel,so don,t make a habit of driving around with low fuel,the diesel is your coolant reservoir for keeping the vp44 cool.So to be clear,vp44 do not block by-pass completely,a little stronger spring 18 psi is optimal.Cp-3 blocking by-pass works to achieve 20 plus psi.Think about it,when you put a draw straw into the intank reservoir for external lift pump do you have a functioning by-pass.NO only returning fuel filling reservoir.
Good Luck, The poor mans fix for greater fuel pressure.

Last edited by dennismorgan; 09-05-2013 at 05:02 PM. Reason: left out critical point
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Old 09-07-2013, 04:18 PM   #40  
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Modify your stock steering shaft-rag joint delete

I recently purchased a used Borgeson steering shaft locally for my 2001 2500 for $100, pretty good deal I thought since these are normally around $270. As soon as I installed it and went for a drive I immediately noticed that the steering was much tighter but there was definitely a clunking that I could feel in the steering wheel when going over bumps that wasn't there before. After a couple days of driving like this I started to do some research and found that this is a common problem with the Borgeson shaft and many people return them because of this, unfortunately I didn't have that option so I started thinking about how I could get rid of this clunk and that's what made me think about re using the stock shaft except with out the rubber rag joint that was causing play. In less than 10 minutes and with about $4 worth of new hardware I had completely removed the rag joint by cutting the 4 rivets that hold it in place and bolted the 2 ends together with grade 8 3/8x1 1/2" bolts, lock washers and loc tite. The steering is now just as precise as it was with the Borgeson shaft and no clunks at all. It takes much longer to remove and install the steering shaft than it does to modify it...I don't know why anyone would buy a Borgeson or replace the sloppy stock shaft. Maybe others have done this but in all of my searching I couldn't find anyone else that has.

Pic 1: stock shaft unmodified
Pic 2: rag joint removed
Pic 3: Modified shaft re installed

*The holes need to be drilled out with a 3/8 bit to accept the 3/8 bolts.
*Before bolting the shaft back together, pump some grease into the shaft to lube it and also grease both ends where they connect to the steering column and the steering box.
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:19 PM   #41  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronze_Bandit View Post
I recently purchased a used Borgeson steering shaft locally for my 2001 2500 for $100, pretty good deal I thought since these are normally around $270. As soon as I installed it and went for a drive I immediately noticed that the steering was much tighter but there was definitely a clunking that I could feel in the steering wheel when going over bumps that wasn't there before. After a couple days of driving like this I started to do some research and found that this is a common problem with the Borgeson shaft and many people return them because of this, unfortunately I didn't have that option so I started thinking about how I could get rid of this clunk and that's what made me think about re using the stock shaft except with out the rubber rag joint that was causing play. In less than 10 minutes and with about $4 worth of new hardware I had completely removed the rag joint by cutting the 4 rivets that hold it in place and bolted the 2 ends together with grade 8 3/8x1 1/2" bolts, lock washers and loc tite. The steering is now just as precise as it was with the Borgeson shaft and no clunks at all. It takes much longer to remove and install the steering shaft than it does to modify it...I don't know why anyone would buy a Borgeson or replace the sloppy stock shaft. Maybe others have done this but in all of my searching I couldn't find anyone else that has.

Pic 1: stock shaft unmodified
Pic 2: rag joint removed
Pic 3: Modified shaft re installed

*The holes need to be drilled out with a 3/8 bit to accept the 3/8 bolts.
*Before bolting the shaft back together, pump some grease into the shaft to lube it and also grease both ends where they connect to the steering column and the steering box.
Bronze Bandit,my truck has this clunk as well in the steering colum, what is the function of the rag joint?If i were strictly a highway guy i would follow your lead in taking out the clunk. However i spend considerable time on rough roads and i think that rag joint needs to be there to take the pounding off of the steering box and other bearings,perhaps even to lessen the shock impact on the steering wheel,it,s just my observation ,what do others think about this fix.
,
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Old 09-15-2013, 03:06 PM   #42  
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Thermostats

Quote:
Originally Posted by DGinGA View Post
My stock 2000 RAM 2500 takes 10 minutes to warm up to the point that it will run above an idle. This happens always, even in 80 degree weather. Using the block heater shortens the time somewhat. My neighbor has a 2001 and his is the same way. I've been told this a fact of life for these trucks, but that would make them somewhat useless for daily drivers (mine is a secondary vehicle).
I've seen posters in other forums say to put in a higher temp thermostat, but I can't see how that would change anything. Anyone have any knowledge about this?
Thanks
I have a stock 2001 and warms up fine.THERMOSTATS DO WEAR OUT.I would try replacing it.I have gone to a 180 thermostat but i live in a hot climate and tow.With the 180 degree my temp stays below half in a hot climate,with the 190 it used to go up to 3/4.
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Old 11-13-2013, 06:29 PM   #43  
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What years of 24v have the KDP issue? I have a 2000 HO. It was invoilved in a front end collision so I thought I may as well do it while the radiator is out of the truck
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:01 PM   #44  
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I'm new here but I have a 2002 Cummins .my won't allow me too brake the tires loose .on top I have
A vibration or noise coming from the
Transfer case .my truck has 250000.its go new
100 hp injectors ddrp lift pump and a ts performance
Mp8 power play. .in don't know what too do about the noise or vibration can someone help.
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Old 10-04-2016, 12:28 PM   #45  
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So i need some help guys, I got a 1998 ram2500 24valve 4x4 dana 60 front end cad operated. well sometime before i bought it the 4wd must of had some issues because instead of fixing it properly they welded the coupler on the 2 axles for 4wd ive got new axles and such need some help on how to get the old one out because as we know the hole there is pretty small.
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