PDA

View Full Version : Block Heater


Doug I.
12-05-2002, 02:11 PM
Does anyone know for sure how 97' 5.9 oem block heater works. What I mean is does is cycle on and off, or does it get to let's say 100', then just stay there. I thought it would cycle, but if it only gets to 100' and stays there, the water will not get any hotter either, so no risk of getting too hot. Any thought on this. Thank you

Lary Ellis (Top)
12-05-2002, 02:21 PM
Doug they do not cycle. I leave mine on for weeks at a time when it is real cold. They will not get too hot or damage anything.<br> Some guys who leave for work on a set schedule use a timer to start it 4 hours before they leave to save electricity. I never know when I may decide to go somewhere so I just keep her nice and warm. I replaced one heater in 7 years for a sum of approx 60 bucks with the cord.<br> Welcome to the site! :)

Doug I.
12-05-2002, 02:36 PM
Do you know by chance how many watts they are so I can figure how much electricity it uses. I am like you, I never know when I may use my truck, so I would like to plug it in, and just leave it.

jfpointer
12-05-2002, 03:10 PM
I think I saw somewhere on the site that it works out to about a 6.5 amp draw.

Commatoze
12-05-2002, 03:43 PM
<br>I think I saw somewhere on the site that it works out to about a 6.5 amp draw.<br><br><br>Yes, they consume about 750 watts.

jfpointer
12-05-2002, 03:57 PM
<br><br>I think I saw somewhere on the site that it works out to about a 6.5 amp draw.<br><br><br>Yes, they consume about 750 watts.<br><br><br>I've been re-wiring my house, so I'm stuck in ampacity mode... [laugh]

Commatoze
12-05-2002, 08:21 PM
Either unit, they spin your meter the same. ::) ... ;D

chuck3
12-05-2002, 08:40 PM
Top are you sure they don't cycle? Sometimes when I unplug mine I see a spark and sometimes not. ???

Commatoze
12-05-2002, 09:11 PM
Chuck, a simple part like the block heater is an enigma as far as the service manual goes. It's briefly mentioned, but has no diagnostic procedures. I'm almost positive that it's a simple immersion heater like those coils you use to heat a cup of water; plug it in and it's on till you unplug it. But to be certain, I'll try this tomorrow night after I get home, and the engine coolant is hot, If I place an ohm meter across the plug prongs, I should get a very low resistance if it's on constantly. If it's on a thermostat, the coolant temperature should be enough to turn it off, and the ohm meter should read &quot;open&quot;. I'll let you know.

-Tom-

&lt;edit&gt; I'll tell you one thing. I plugged in last night while the temps were in the low 20's. Run time was 3 hours. My &quot;wait to start&quot; light was only on for maybe 5 seconds this morning, and I had some luke warm air immediately from the heater. That engine will wake the dead though when it's cold! Bet my neighbors love me. ::)

yomitch
12-06-2002, 12:07 AM
sometimes its the luck of the draw at what part of the cycle (voltage) when you pull the plug out that you'll see sparks.<br>The heater does stay on all the time hence needing a timer if you are electricity concious. 750 watts I think is about right.<br><br>.75kw x # of hours per day x price per kw hour x 30 days = monthly electric bill.<br><br>I have mine on a timer set for 3 am leave fo work at 6 and its just fine<br><br>Mitch

Redleg
12-06-2002, 03:29 PM
<br><br><br>I think I saw somewhere on the site that it works out to about a 6.5 amp draw.<br><br><br>Yes, they consume about 750 watts.<br><br><br>I've been re-wiring my house, so I'm stuck in ampacity mode... [laugh]<br><br><br>Rewired the garage last winter anticipating a diesel, adding extra duplex's to the new front porch, and I have to add one to the barn. I can't always park in the same place. If anybody takes on a project like that, I'd recommend making the circuit 20amp. The heavier wire will be more efficient, and you'll be able to add Christmas lights.

Commatoze
12-06-2002, 05:41 PM
I checked the block heater tonight with a DVOM and a water temp of around 185o and there was a small resistance across the prongs of the plug which confirms that it's on all of the time.

jfpointer
12-06-2002, 05:45 PM
It's plugged in on a 20 amp circuit protected by a GFI. The extension cord is a 100 foot or so 12/3 number with a real rubber jacket that I bought at an auction for $8. I couldn't pass up that deal. [laugh]

chuck3
12-06-2002, 05:47 PM
Thanks for the info Tom. :) I figured it did but after seeing the sparks,made me wonder.

Commatoze
12-06-2002, 06:08 PM
It's plugged in on a 20 amp circuit protected by a GFI. The extension cord is a 100 foot or so 12/3 number with a real rubber jacket that I bought at an auction for $8. I couldn't pass up that deal. [laugh]


You bet. I was just outside wrestling with 50 feet of vinyl jacketed 12/3 &gt;:( in 15o temps and wishing I bought a rubber or silicone jacket instead. One thing that's working very good so far is my digital timer. Real precise instead of having to use those pegs on the analog timers.